Webinar: The Ottawa Treaty Today with Lloyd Axworthy & Olivia Fernandes

November 17th at 7:30pm EST on Zoom | Register HERE

This event is being held in partnership with the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. Attendance is free, but registration is required. If you have any questions about registration, contact Eric Story at [email protected].

It has been almost twenty four years since the signing of The Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on the Destruction—popularly known as the Ottawa Treaty.

It has been almost twenty four years since the signing of The Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on the Destruction—popularly known as the Ottawa Treaty.

However, significant challenges remain, and there has been back-tracking. The USA, Russia, China, India, Pakistan, Iran and some others continue to decline or reject adding their signatures, and in some cases are believed to have continued to make use of these weapons in conflict; and landmines have continued to maim or kill refugees and internally displaced people seeking to return to their homes.

This event will begin with a short ten-minute documentary on the origins of the Ottawa Treaty and Canada’s instrumental role in its creation. Host Alistair Edgar will then moderate a discussion about the achievements of the treaty, the threats that landmines continue to pose to innocent civilian populations, and the practical and policy challenges that remain to be addressed.

Audience members will be permitted to submit written questions.

Lloyd Axworthy served as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1996-2000. He became internationally known for his advancement of the human security concept, in particular, the Ottawa Treaty – a landmark global treaty banning anti-personnel landmines. For his leadership on landmines, Dr. Axworthy was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Olivia R. Fernandes is a human rights and participatory growth focused international development practitioner. Her work spans the areas of disarmament, complex humanitarian emergencies, Indigenous rights, post-conflict rehabilitation. She has been a member of the Canadian Landmine Foundation’s Board of Directors since 2016.

Alistair Edgar is chair of the Canadian Landmine Foundation and an associate professor of Political Science at Wilfrid Laurier University and. His research focuses on transitional justice in war-to-peace transitions and post-conflict peace building, with fieldwork in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Kosovo, and northern Uganda